The Pacifica Project (finished)

#1
Hello,
I have a Yamaha pacifica with really wornout frets and a refret costs around €150 so I thought I could better buy a new neck, and give the guitar a makeover.

I could try to refret the neck myself but I don't think that's a good idea, and that I could better bring it to a shop for that.

I want to upgrade hardware and pickups, maybe give the guitar a paint job because I recently got hit by a car with my guitar and now it has some significant damage.
Thankfully my bike has more damage then me:)

So now I have the option to buy a second hand Harley benton/squier neck, buy a cheap neck from ebay or buy a Chinese neck from Vox Humana(a local shop)

I want a neck with a pointy headstock, so I will probably reshape the headstock. I need a 22 fret neck. I maybe want to stain the neck if it's rosewood. I'm not sure if I should get a maple or a rosewood board. I know that the neck I will buy will probably need some work. I have never done a fret job before. Is it hard to do a fret job properly yourself?

So what do you guys think I should buy? Could you give the cons and pros?
And could you please describe your experience with the necks?

By the way I live in Europe, so if I buy a neck in America I will probably pay more for shipping then for the neck.

I hope to hear from you soon!
 
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#3
Hmm....if you're thinking of buying a Harley Benton neck, I'd perhaps be tempted just to buy a whole guitar.

Refretting yourself would be difficult, without expert guidance, and you would almost certainly regret starting it. Levelling and crowning frets is a real pain in the arse, especially if you don't have specialist tools which are, of course, too expensive to buy for a one-off job.

I bought a Harley Benton kit guitar a couple of years ago, but the neck and body didn't fit together very well, and the neck ended up a little bit misaligned. That was partly due to my own inexperience - now I would know better how to look out for the problem and correct it - but also because of the poor fit.

Given that you implied that there was damage to the body too, I'd really think seriously about my first suggestion - just buy a new guitar!
 
#5
Hmm....if you're thinking of buying a Harley Benton neck, I'd perhaps be tempted just to buy a whole guitar.

Refretting yourself would be difficult, without expert guidance, and you would almost certainly regret starting it. Levelling and crowning frets is a real pain in the arse, especially if you don't have specialist tools which are, of course, too expensive to buy for a one-off job.

I bought a Harley Benton kit guitar a couple of years ago, but the neck and body didn't fit together very well, and the neck ended up a little bit misaligned. That was partly due to my own inexperience - now I would know better how to look out for the problem and correct it - but also because of the poor fit.

Given that you implied that there was damage to the body too, I'd really think seriously about my first suggestion - just buy a new guitar!
This yamaha is my first guitar, and the damage isnt that bad. I can buy a Harley benton deluxe model neck for €35. I'd rather have a cool guitar with my own customization then a stock Harley benton.
 
#6
Hey @I NEED HELP123 you fellow Dutchie.
First off: you're certain that you'd want to 'restore' the Pacifica rather than buy something different altogether? The reason why I'm asking this is because it's highly unlikely to see a rise in value of that guitar. If this is your only (electric) guitar than buying something new is the way for you.

The proper stuff that Vox Humana does is great. If you want that Pacifica to be a serious guitar again I'd give it to them to work their magic. But again, this price figure is probably not going to be worth your while. If you want something to mess around with and learn by doing it yourself, than I'd suggest just getting any sort of neck blank, whether that is from Vox Humana, eBay or something else. The Cheaper the better because it won't hurt as much when you fuck it up... :p
 

Chu

Well-Known Member
#7
You've got a Yamaha Pacifica, the body needs to be repaired, you're planning on replacing the hardware and need a new neck?

No offence meant my friend but that's a lot of work for a budget guitar, especially as the only original part at the end will the repaired body!
 
#8
Hey @I NEED HELP123 you fellow Dutchie.
First off: you're certain that you'd want to 'restore' the Pacifica rather than buy something different altogether? The reason why I'm asking this is because it's highly unlikely to see a rise in value of that guitar. If this is your only (electric) guitar than buying something new is the way for you.

The proper stuff that Vox Humana does is great. If you want that Pacifica to be a serious guitar again I'd give it to them to work their magic. But again, this price figure is probably not going to be worth your while. If you want something to mess around with and learn by doing it yourself, than I'd suggest just getting any sort of neck blank, whether that is from Vox Humana, eBay or something else. The Cheaper the better because it won't hurt as much when you fuck it up... :p
Hey fellow Dutchie,

Yes, I'm certain I want to upgrade the guitar, it's my first guitar that I did my first gigs with. I'm going to keep it so I don't bother about the value. I'm getting another guitar for Christmas that I restored myself (new wiring and shielding, polishing, and some other stuff).

I want to upgrade the guitar myself, put new pickups in, replace the tone pot with a killswitch, shielding and some other stuff. I think I will buy a neck from Vox humana and make it fit perfectly. The neck that's currently on the guitar doesn't fit properly.

You've got a Yamaha Pacifica, the body needs to be repaired, you're planning on replacing the hardware and need a new neck?

No offence meant my friend but that's a lot of work for a budget guitar, especially as the only original part at the end will the repaired body!
I'm either going to leave the body as it is or completely refinish the guitar. I think I will leave it as it is, because every dent and scratch is a memory of one of my first gigs, and I think It will be worth it in the end. Besides I will learn a lot from it I think!
 
#9
I'm thinking of maybe making it of a Palermo pg3/van halen kinda guitar with a flat mount Floyd Rose but with my own touch, I would need help from a pro though or I would need to pay a pro to do it for me
 
#10
I'm thinking of maybe making it of a Palermo pg3/van halen kinda guitar with a flat mount Floyd Rose but with my own touch, I would need help from a pro though or I would need to pay a pro to do it for me
How proficient are you in tinkering like this? Assuming your Pacifica is the standard Strat-esque tremolo type and also assuming that you have zero Floyd rose experience, I would strongly discourage trying to fit that to the guitar. Flat mount even more so. The theory of making something is infinitely easier than making it so and actually getting it to work. Keep it simple for the first-ish(?) time.

I’d say start on the neck with everything that you want to do there. Then try the body, proper finishing requires a dang lot of skill. Finish off with the hardware & electronics.
 
#11
How proficient are you in tinkering like this? Assuming your Pacifica is the standard Strat-esque tremolo type and also assuming that you have zero Floyd rose experience, I would strongly discourage trying to fit that to the guitar. Flat mount even more so. The theory of making something is infinitely easier than making it so and actually getting it to work. Keep it simple for the first-ish(?) time.

I’d say start on the neck with everything that you want to do there. Then try the body, proper finishing requires a dang lot of skill. Finish off with the hardware & electronics.
I have never done this before, but that's why I said that I needed a pro to atleast help me. And I will start with the neck and the other stuff before looking to a Floyd. I have done these kinda things before and indeed, from my experiences you need to overestimate the difficulty of the job your doing. But thx for reminding me of that!

Why do you discourage me more with a flat mount floyd? Is a flat mount harder then a floating one? I thought flat mount was easier because of the routing and setup.
 
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DrHankWanfordSnr

That's not new, its always been there.
#12
I have never done this before, but that's why I said that I needed a pro to atleast help me. And I will start with the neck and the other stuff before looking to a Floyd. I have done these kinda things before and indeed, from my experiences you need to overestimate the difficulty of the job your doing. But thx for reminding me of that!

Why do you discourage me more with a flat mount floyd? Is a flat mount harder then a floating one? I thought flat mount was easier because of the routing and setup.
I think the reticence comes from the relative difficulty of the things you are setting out to do. Drilling for a bridge (the post holes), and a neck are two tricky jobs as getting them a mm wrong adds up to a guitar that isn't straight. Making a 3rd party neck fit can be easy - or really difficult if the heel doesn't fit into your neck pocket.

I think learning from doing stuff is fun though - making mistakes and learning from them is part of this. Every guitar project I do works out better than the last - it s a journey !
 
#13
I think the reticence comes from the relative difficulty of the things you are setting out to do. Drilling for a bridge (the post holes), and a neck are two tricky jobs as getting them a mm wrong adds up to a guitar that isn't straight. Making a 3rd party neck fit can be easy - or really difficult if the heel doesn't fit into your neck pocket.

I think learning from doing stuff is fun though - making mistakes and learning from them is part of this. Every guitar project I do works out better than the last - it s a journey !
I think you're exactly right!!!!

I will have to very carefully measure where the post holes for the bridge need to be, and the neck holes also. I think I will bring the neck and body to my school where I can drill the holes with a drillpress.
 
#14
Now i am thinking of buying a cheap jackson guitar and taking the neck and hardware of that and putting it on the pacifica, Then sell the body.

what do you guys think?
 

ed lespaul

Well-Known Member
#15
It may or may not fit. Unless you're comfortable with a chisel, find out BEFORE jumping in.

Also, I don't mean to crap on your pacifica, but they're cheap guitars. Just sell the one you have, get what you can, buy a new one.
 
#16
It may or may not fit. Unless you're comfortable with a chisel, find out BEFORE jumping in.

Also, I don't mean to crap on your pacifica, but they're cheap guitars. Just sell the one you have, get what you can, buy a new one.
I know it's a cheap guitar but I am gonna replace all the crap hardware and put a new neck in because the frets on the neck currently are very worn. The body is Alder, and I think cheap guitars can sound just as good as a expensive one. For example Eddie van halen with his $50 body and $75 neck.
 
#17
Also, I realised I probably cannot get a neck from ebay because of the rosewood cites.
Or could I get a neck from ebay with rosewood fretboard without problems?
 

Felix

Addicted to Grunge
#18
Also, I realised I probably cannot get a neck from ebay because of the rosewood cites.
Or could I get a neck from ebay with rosewood fretboard without problems?
I don't think you will have too much of an issue with it to be honest.

Why not try getting an unfinished maple neck? It's so nice to play on a maple neck and board with no lacquer on it.
 
#19
I don't think you will have too much of an issue with it to be honest.

Why not try getting an unfinished maple neck? It's so nice to play on a maple neck and board with no lacquer on it.
I also thought of that, but I read on some other forums that the maple neck isnt durable then. What do you think?
I'm now maybe thinking of saving some more money and buying a maple charvel neck.
 

Felix

Addicted to Grunge
#20
I also thought of that, but I read on some other forums that the maple neck isnt durable then. What do you think?
I'm now maybe thinking of saving some more money and buying a maple charvel neck.
I would find it hard to believe that there is any durability differences between having a rosewood or maple board. A maple Charvel neck or even getting a neck from Warmoth, as they do these killer necks made totally from Rosewood. Either a Charvel or Warmoth neck is going to be a really quality item, but the prices are going to be more than what the body is worth. Warmoth is the only officially licensed Fender body parts.

My Les Paul Custom actually has a baked maple fretboard, which goes almost as dark as ebony when it's well oiled and feels and plays like an ebony board.

Speaking of Ebony, it's always nice to have a neck with an Ebony fretboard and is becoming more common due to the CITES on Rosewood.

I did a custom Fender Strat build a few years ago and it's so satisfying building a totally baller spec guitar with your own hands.
 
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