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How to avoid being scammed when buying guitar stuff. Some tips...

bad alice

Easily distracted and...OHLOOKAGUITAR!!!
#1
Bearing in mind that this is one of most prospective gear buyer's nightmares, I thought I'd share some tips a good fella on FB took the time to post yesterday.
All sensible and solid advice...

If anyone else has any other helpful suggestions then please add them below...
:)
 

johnniegoat

Stop, don’t, come back.
#2
bad alice

there is a known Paypal scam if you are selling as well

it goes like this

you sell something on ebay and the buyer uses paypal. then they collect the thing - the key is no courier, so no POD

the buyer then goes to ebay/Paypal and claims they have not received the thing. you can't provide a POD

ebay/ paypal policy is *always* to side with the buyer, so they get a full refund and you are left no cash, no thing and possiby blacklisetd on ebay with your credit rating knacked. i know a couple of people this happened to with guitar related stuff

bunch more here

https://www.lovemoney.com/news/12513/watch-out-for-this-ebay-scam
 

bad alice

Easily distracted and...OHLOOKAGUITAR!!!
#3
Yep. Another scam that should raise alarm bells is the "buyer" offering to send you money to pay for the item and cover courier costs (usually via Western Union or PayPal) so that you'll send the item to them (somewhere abroad). The idea is you send the item and they immediately remove the funds from the Western Union/PayPal account. And you lose the item and the cash.
Sh*tbags.
 

bad alice

Easily distracted and...OHLOOKAGUITAR!!!
#4
Also, the above may also include a convincing, logo bearing email from PayPal saying funds are now safely in your PayPal account. ALWAYS click on the email's "sent from" address and double check with PayPal (even if looks real) to see if it's legit or not. PayPal are keen to stop these frauds so they'll get back to you pronto.

Sent from my HTC One M8s using Tapatalk
 

Robstafarian

The Good and Wise Call Me “Rufus”
#5
Also, the above may also include a convincing, logo bearing email from PayPal saying funds are now safely in your PayPal account. ALWAYS click on the email's "sent from" address and double check with PayPal (even if looks real) to see if it's legit or not. PayPal are keen to stop these frauds so they'll get back to you pronto.
NEVER click a link in any such email: manually open a browser window to confirm with Paypal.
 

Lone Star

Well-Known Member
#7
I rarely use PayPal. I try to get people to do bank transfers to avoid the fees anyway. Works out well all around.

Plus, I've given up selling gear. I've nothing to sell anyway :p
 

Alex Theory

Northern Monkey
#8
I've recently discovered and have used transpact - it's an escrow service so the funds are held centrally until the goods are received, the buyer then releases those funds to the seller. In event of a dispute it goes to arbitration instead of like paypal automatically siding with the buyer.

And the best bit is it only costs £6!
 

Alex Theory

Northern Monkey
#10
Adding a bit to the original post, if you use Google Chrome, all you need to do to reverse image search is to right click and select 'Search Google for image'.

Here's a test - this is a photo a scammer tried to use when selling a '56 Les Paul Junior on Facebook.

13187747_10156863702825551_1114285845_n (1).jpg


Right click the above and select 'Search Google for image'.

Untitled.jpg

Under 'Visually similar images' you'll find this:



So you can see clearly that a 6 and 7 have been swapped around in the serial in photoshop, the photo cropped to get rid of the guitarHQ watermark and then re-posted to defraud.
 

mirage2101

Well-Known Member
#14
Looking at the the from address in an email is safe.... although spoofing an SMTP address is piss easy so not the best proof of fake/real.
In this day and age.. Don't click it anyway. There are a couple of ways to make at least obscure what's happening.


My experience is not so much about scamming as well as people selling stuff as something more expensive.
I tried out a 2nd hand les paul that was supposedly a $1500 plus model. I had my doubts going in. If the guitar was a couple of years newer then stated it'd be an $800 axe.
So I drove over, tried it... And well there's no way that was the $1500 model. It wasn't a bad guitar at all but not worth the $700 the guy was asking.
Now he got the guitar from his parents or a friend or something like that. He honestly didn't seem to know better. But especially if you're a less experienced player it's easy to spend too much money.

If that had've been my second guitar I probably would've bought it because it would've been a truckload better then my first guitar.

The lesson here.. If it's too good to be true, it probably is, check serials.. And if in doubt.. don't do it.
I'm sure there are good deals out there.. But you're not going to get something for half of what it's worth anymore.
 

ed lespaul

Well-Known Member
#15
Buy (any) gear from me. All my gear posts are EXACTLY how they are, including any slight scratches in pedals. I'd rather sleep at night, than try to beat someone out of a few dollars.

When I sold my Godin, the guy was pretty much a new guitar player, but wanted my Godin. He didn't even really look at it. I gave him a tutorial on what to look for when buying a guitar in the future.

On several occasions, I've had buyers text me the next day, telling me how great the guitar is, and how much they love it.
 

Robstafarian

The Good and Wise Call Me “Rufus”
#16
Buy (any) gear from me. All my gear posts are EXACTLY how they are, including any slight scratches in pedals. I'd rather sleep at night, than try to beat someone out of a few dollars. […] On several occasions, I've had buyers text me the next day, telling me how great the guitar is, and how much they love it.
Ditto!
 
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