The 'Quick question' Thread

Tankman

Well-Known Member
Is there anybody on here with experience in digitally signing contracts, especially in France? Would a signature with a mouse or your finger in case of a mobile device be enough to make it legal?
 
Is there anybody on here with experience in digitally signing contracts, especially in France? Would a signature with a mouse or your finger in case of a mobile device be enough to make it legal?
So an agreement or ‘contract’ generally happens by an offer by party A and an accepting of the offer by party B.
Generally speaking in law, the way, shape or form via any method whatsoever for accepting a legal offer does not matter. There are cases where parties have been semi-bound (legally) by ongoing negotiations. In some instances the law itself might require more actual proof, which can be done by forcing parties to use a notary, for example with buying and selling a house.

So in a short example you could be legally bound to an agreement if you’d have given a thumbs up via a Facetime chat. The problems starts when either party disagrees with the other’s interpretation. In that case you start a legal battle where you prove and convice the courtroom of your correct standpoint, you can then use all your arguments pro/con accepting the thumbs up as a legally binding way to be held to an agreement. The same applies to digitally signed documents. You might argue that the contents of the agreement are too high value for a simple digital signature and/or contest that said scribble is your signature.

In France you’d need baguette and red wine obviously. Trade law is pretty universally in general terms, because trade isn’t limited to borders like the law is. Any details might ofcourse complicate your issue. If it’s that serious your legal professional should obviously assist.
 

Tankman

Well-Known Member
So an agreement or ‘contract’ generally happens by an offer by party A and an accepting of the offer by party B.
Generally speaking in law, the way, shape or form via any method whatsoever for accepting a legal offer does not matter. There are cases where parties have been semi-bound (legally) by ongoing negotiations. In some instances the law itself might require more actual proof, which can be done by forcing parties to use a notary, for example with buying and selling a house.

So in a short example you could be legally bound to an agreement if you’d have given a thumbs up via a Facetime chat. The problems starts when either party disagrees with the other’s interpretation. In that case you start a legal battle where you prove and convice the courtroom of your correct standpoint, you can then use all your arguments pro/con accepting the thumbs up as a legally binding way to be held to an agreement. The same applies to digitally signed documents. You might argue that the contents of the agreement are too high value for a simple digital signature and/or contest that said scribble is your signature.

In France you’d need baguette and red wine obviously. Trade law is pretty universally in general terms, because trade isn’t limited to borders like the law is. Any details might ofcourse complicate your issue. If it’s that serious your legal professional should obviously assist.
Thanks and sorry for the late reply.

In our case it's a basic dealer agreement. Select you dealer level/discount and sign here. It's usually a prolongation of an existing contract, seeing as in France you have to renew these types of contracts every year. We want to save paper and time by doing it digitally. That, and well, dealing with the French can be a challenge so we want to make it idiot proof.
 
Ketchup or brown sauce?
Go...
:)
I never quite understood the hype with Ketchup. AFAIK it’s either mayonaise or curry sauce over here. Conaisseur of Ketchup over either mayo or curry is pretty rare in my immediate surroundings.
Ketchup is too tomato-y and not nearly spicy enough! ;)

Also, I see your ketchup and I raise you Peanut sauce and apple sauce! :p
 
Top