the g.a.s thread.

Good to see Gibson willing to try new shit with sigs rather than just a slightly different colour. Hopefully a good sign going forward.
I think Gibson has always allowed for whatever with their signature artists. The problem is that before you are allowed to be signature artist for Gibson, you are chosen by them. They choose for example a player like Slash, who already loves his Les Pauls or Angus Young with his SGs. Because of that they are bound to keep it classic, with minimal twists, like for example adding a piezo system or fancy switchery.

Also the new Joe Perry sig is just wrong in my view. All kudos to Perry for enjoying it though.
 
I think Gibson has always allowed for whatever with their signature artists. The problem is that before you are allowed to be signature artist for Gibson, you are chosen by them. They choose for example a player like Slash, who already loves his Les Pauls or Angus Young with his SGs. Because of that they are bound to keep it classic, with minimal twists, like for example adding a piezo system or fancy switchery.

Also the new Joe Perry sig is just wrong in my view. All kudos to Perry for enjoying it though.
I had heard stories of Mark Tremonti wanting to put a trem on a Les Paul but Gibson not allowing it, hence he moved to PRS. Granted, that was 20-odd years ago (before the axcess), but I hear it's not unique.
 
I had heard stories of Mark Tremonti wanting to put a trem on a Les Paul but Gibson not allowing it, hence he moved to PRS. Granted, that was 20-odd years ago (before the axcess), but I hear it's not unique.
My guess is that was before Tremonti being semi-well known in the business. PRS back then was obviously still building up to ‘mainstream’. Having an artist play your brand creates a quick following. Cue Tremonti going that road. Hell, I still remember first seeing a PRS because of a band that played them and it hasn’t stopped me wanting one ever since.
Gibson had a history of reluctance to sign artists. The story is that Slash’ Derrig Lester was the back-up plan because Gibson wasn’t willing to deliver to a relatively unknown LA guitarist in the early 80s. Before the Lester he played the Mockingbirds and whatnot because they were simply cheaper and therefore simply around for a Rock and roll band full of adolescent addicts... :p Whatever Gibson’s reasons might be for their reluctance is beyond me. I guess traditionalism was the biggest.

Gibson seems to have turned around in the last couple of years. I think they saw how well that market could be advertisement wise at Fenders example. Also I’ve seen more and more artists advertised by them of which I’d never heard of before.

I still think you’re semi-right with Gibson wanting to be more traditional with their artist’s signature gear. If it looks more like the regular product, they’ll sell more of the regular product. I do think they’ve been more ‘experimental’ since about 2010. We’ve had factory fitted Floyds, Guitar of the Months (some crazy) and the Robots, Dusk Tigers and Firebird Xs. I agree that’s all hardly signature gear but my guess is that is primarily down to the artists they’ve signed. Zakk Wylde still got them to do his Buzzsaw Flying V and SG Fusion-monstrosity. In a sense this Joe Perry StratoPaul only bodes well for artists wanting more ‘special’ features.
 
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