Rate the Last Film You Watched

Chili Hobbes

So much time, and so little to do.
I disagree. That movie was great!!!
Meh. The tough loner was a sex pest bully, the stuck up princess didnt grow, the jock and nerd were 2 dimentional and the one fun character Ally Sheedys goth enigma got a makeover to change her so she could get the jock. 3 was generous ;)
 

beans & rice

Well-Known Member
Meh. The tough loner was a sex pest bully, the stuck up princess didnt grow, the jock and nerd were 2 dimentional and the one fun character Ally Sheedys goth enigma got a makeover to change her so she could get the jock. 3 was generous ;)
Bender was a product of his upbringing, but he did have a desire to change and be better. He bristled at the cycle he was in and didn't know how to escape. He wasn't closed off to learning and growing, but no one bothered to try to reach him before that day. He was obviously smart, he just didn't know what to do with it.

Claire did grow. She reached out to people she wouldn't have otherwise, because she would be ridiculed and shunned. She admitted as much near the end, but did move beyond that fear by the end.

Andrew was born and bred to be a jock, but he showed a seemingly rare thoughtful side when forced to confront his offense of taping Larry Lester's buns together. He didn't want to be a bad person, like he was taught was part of who he had to be to succeed. He learned that you have to lose sometimes to make your victories count.

Brian Ralph (as in puke) Johnson exhibited the pressures that intelligent kids have to shoulder, that mistakes are death. In his case death was literally the only escape he knew for failure. He and Andrew were a lot alike in that regard. Neither could allow themselves to fail for fear it would unravel everything they would ever hope to do.

Allison was an enigma because no one cared about her. That group was the only bunch of people to ever try and so she let her walls down for them.

It was the 80s and those were the archetypes of kids in most American high schools, and maybe that prism is a bit cloudy and dated. But they had to reach enough people by seeming relatable, so they were broad in design.

I'm not saying you should like it. But I feel it's worth a little more consideration than that. Maybe it just doesn't hold up well over time to new viewers.

I'm a mama bear when it comes to my John Hughes movies. :D;)
 

ed lespaul

Well-Known Member
Bender was a product of his upbringing, but he did have a desire to change and be better. He bristled at the cycle he was in and didn't know how to escape. He wasn't closed off to learning and growing, but no one bothered to try to reach him before that day. He was obviously smart, he just didn't know what to do with it.

Claire did grow. She reached out to people she wouldn't have otherwise, because she would be ridiculed and shunned. She admitted as much near the end, but did move beyond that fear by the end.

Andrew was born and bred to be a jock, but he showed a seemingly rare thoughtful side when forced to confront his offense of taping Larry Lester's buns together. He didn't want to be a bad person, like he was taught was part of who he had to be to succeed. He learned that you have to lose sometimes to make your victories count.

Brian Ralph (as in puke) Johnson exhibited the pressures that intelligent kids have to shoulder, that mistakes are death. In his case death was literally the only escape he knew for failure. He and Andrew were a lot alike in that regard. Neither could allow themselves to fail for fear it would unravel everything they would ever hope to do.

Allison was an enigma because no one cared about her. That group was the only bunch of people to ever try and so she let her walls down for them.

It was the 80s and those were the archetypes of kids in most American high schools, and maybe that prism is a bit cloudy and dated. But they had to reach enough people by seeming relatable, so they were broad in design.

I'm not saying you should like it. But I feel it's worth a little more consideration than that. Maybe it just doesn't hold up well over time to new viewers.

I'm a mama bear when it comes to my John Hughes movies. :D;)
It’s holds up fine. This is pretty much how high school was, before safe spaces
 

bad alice

Easily distracted and...OHLOOKAGUITAR!!!
M&I finished off the Harry Potter films last night
Can’t say they made a huge impression on either of us - they were okay.
But that said, it’s good to no longer feel like we’re stuck out in a cultural abyss whenever someone mentions Hagrid or Quiditch!
:)
 
Brimstone; 19th century (western) centered around some christian-insanity by (Dutch-)settlers (the most nutty fucks from here left for the promised land), made by a Dutchman I hold highly.

I generally enjoy westerns, even though I shouldn’t probably call this a western in the sense it usually means to people. I obviously recommend it. ;)
 
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Chili Hobbes

So much time, and so little to do.
Bender was a product of his upbringing, but he did have a desire to change and be better. He bristled at the cycle he was in and didn't know how to escape. He wasn't closed off to learning and growing, but no one bothered to try to reach him before that day. He was obviously smart, he just didn't know what to do with it.

Claire did grow. She reached out to people she wouldn't have otherwise, because she would be ridiculed and shunned. She admitted as much near the end, but did move beyond that fear by the end.

Andrew was born and bred to be a jock, but he showed a seemingly rare thoughtful side when forced to confront his offense of taping Larry Lester's buns together. He didn't want to be a bad person, like he was taught was part of who he had to be to succeed. He learned that you have to lose sometimes to make your victories count.

Brian Ralph (as in puke) Johnson exhibited the pressures that intelligent kids have to shoulder, that mistakes are death. In his case death was literally the only escape he knew for failure. He and Andrew were a lot alike in that regard. Neither could allow themselves to fail for fear it would unravel everything they would ever hope to do.

Allison was an enigma because no one cared about her. That group was the only bunch of people to ever try and so she let her walls down for them.

It was the 80s and those were the archetypes of kids in most American high schools, and maybe that prism is a bit cloudy and dated. But they had to reach enough people by seeming relatable, so they were broad in design.

I'm not saying you should like it. But I feel it's worth a little more consideration than that. Maybe it just doesn't hold up well over time to new viewers.

I'm a mama bear when it comes to my John Hughes movies. :D;)
It's nothing to do with the era, I'm a child of the 70s, and consider the 80s the peak of humanity. I'm not anti Hughes either, I love St Elmos Fire, I just didn't like this :) though I dislike 16 Candles too. All the aspects you mention are there I guess, I just expected more and found it awkward, and the change of Alison offended me as a fellow high school goth and outcast :D
 
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