Looking for a New Guitar

#21
I thought one (classic/trad) was meant to be done with the proper 50's spec , kinda like the uber pricey Custom Shop (take a shoot) LP's, but part of the normal range. The Standard is basically the current spec of body type (weight reduction) and any new hardware?

Over the years I've been able to try out a few different levels of LP and bar the dog-turd 2015 LP Studio spec , they have always been pretty nice guitars. I've not tried any 2019 spec stuff as I really don't trust Gibson while they are in the situation of being bankrupt. Actually the '79 Deluxe I had really impressed me, even though it's from a bad era for quality and construction.

From the pricepoint @Stigs is talking about, I don't think getting a USA spec PRS is even possible?

I will say some of the mid 80's to 90's LP's are going to be on that $1500 price point and be fucking epic guitars. Sensei/ @doctorpaul , I would guess you've had a lot of experience with this era of Gibson's as it's around your preferred era of guitars typically?
When I tried to track the history of my Standard - which I bought new - I've eventually had to look into the whole range through the 90s until 2000s. This was because things didn't fully add up to the other Standards I had come across. You have to basically see a split somewhere between 2007-2008 perhaps even 2009. I have been told halfway in 2008 but I'm not convinced of that due to other models I've come across.

Before that time you had a very simple basic line-up: Melody maker/Junior as entree models, Studio as an intermediate model, Classic as an in-between model and the mcDaddy in the Standard. Specs differ as for example some Standard were 50s, like mine more or less is, and then you had others which were 60s. The main difference I'd say was fancy vs. non-fancy. Other than that obviously pickups and stuff like truss rod cover, although sometimes for reasons unclear to me the Standard would just have a blank truss rod cover, mine has a blank one. The Standard had figured tops. The Classics were generally plain ones, special exceptions were made I think. Classics were not necessarily made to be 'poor man's Custom Shop Reissues' . The above range is the simple world pretty much everyone wants from a basic Lester range, with the occasional fancy new colour set.

After that 2007-2008 time they pretty much started fucking up the range. The Traditional was apparently intended to be the basic model which the Standard was; so light figured tops, classic lay-outs but with Classic '57 pickups instead of Burstbuckers. I think this switch from Classic/Standard to Traditional/Standard sort of tunes in with the crazy figured tops becoming more and more 'mainstream' in my views, partly due to PRS making more and more name for itself which probably helped a lot.

With the introduction of the Traditionals, the Standards became their 'project' model. The first offspring is a 'beautifully dreadful' example which shows you their intent. I couldn't find the official Gibson page anymore, they seem to link everything on their website that is older than 2019 back to 2019 nowadays. The model I linked has the ludicrous name ''Gibson 2008 Les Paul Standard'', calling this '2008-model' for easy reference. For a couple of easy spots I like to point at the change to locking tuners, the circuit board-esque pick-up fitting and the idiotic Neutrik Jack which locks your cable, all more or less visible in the pictures of the hyperlink to Amazon I put in above. A less visible change was the asymmetrical neck shape which was introduced on the '2008-model'.

To make matters even worse, Gibson did continue to make Standards à la pre-'2008-model' in the second half of 2008 next to their '2008-model'. My Standard is made in August 2008. My Standard is not the '2008-model', so no Locking tuners, circuit board-ery or Neutrik-nonsense. My Standard is a 'Gibson Les Paul Standard' like it would've been in 2007 and before.

Then 2012/2013/2014 etc. happened.

The above is all basic Gibson USA. Gibson Custom Shop is another story and the Custom Shop Reissues is even another different league all together. The latter are all aimed at top of the bill recreation of the 1950s and 1960s Lesters.

I think the Gibson range might start making more sense if we do make this a drinking game! :p
 

Felix

Addicted to Grunge
#23
@Rick , I know my 2011 LP Classic Custom is totally different to LP's of that range, but are very much like the '08 standards. I never really enjoyed the classic '57 buckers, as they lack the modern edge of the 490/498's I put in. When I looked inside the control cavity, it was the old style, not the PCB version that was getting used. But I am sooooo with you on the lineup being far too complex these days. I'm known for my love of having a pretty basic options with my gear, so it's only nautral for my distain towards stuff being complex for no other reason than to impress.

@SemiCullen , I've never heard of this brand before?

I've often wondered how good the ESP Eclipes models are?
 

Chu

Well-Known Member
#25
I was just joking of course, but you can get used to anything. I used to hate everything Fender related for a long time. Now my 3 main guitars are a strat, a tele-based and a strat-based guitar. You can get used to everything.
I've tried to and had Strats, Teles and Floyds. Each became liked but none felt great and it's taken me years to realise that I drastically prefer guitars with neck angles such as you find on set neck, TOM guitars. I was trying to figure out why I can't fully bond with one of mine and it became clear that it's all about the neck angle. It's such a subtle thing that shouldn't matter but I just can't get past it!
 

Felix

Addicted to Grunge
#26
I've tried to and had Strats, Teles and Floyds. Each became liked but none felt great and it's taken me years to realise that I drastically prefer guitars with neck angles such as you find on set neck, TOM guitars. I was trying to figure out why I can't fully bond with one of mine and it became clear that it's all about the neck angle. It's such a subtle thing that shouldn't matter but I just can't get past it!
Chuy as you know, I was struggling to find a Les Paul that wouldn't hurt my back with it's weight. It took me 6 tries before I realised it was more about the balance of the body. So rather than getting a Les Paul Lite (the hollow one) or a LP Standard that weighs 7lb's I end up finding my LP Custom was the right guitar and it's 10.4lbs! Also, how the actual fuck people manage to play on a thick 50's style neck is beyond me. I'll admit I'm a wimp and need a slim 60's profile, rather than the manly baseball bat style neck.
 

Stigs

Well-Known Member
#27
So I went to a Guitar Shop on Friday and played a 2014 ES-Les Paul that was just really nice. I hesitated to pull the trigger on it (it was slightly out of budget), and I think that was the right move, but I definitely want to try more ES-Les Pauls because this guitar really was something.
 

Felix

Addicted to Grunge
#28
So I went to a Guitar Shop on Friday and played a 2014 ES-Les Paul that was just really nice. I hesitated to pull the trigger on it (it was slightly out of budget), and I think that was the right move, but I definitely want to try more ES-Les Pauls because this guitar really was something.
Is that the hollow body version of the LP?
 

Felix

Addicted to Grunge
#31
Yes it is. It looked like this:
View attachment 36509

Originally when I was on my mission to get myself a higher end model of a Gibson Les Paul, I really wanted to get the hollow body that doesn't have the "F" holes. I thought a lot of the back problems I was getting when playing my old LP Studio was due to the guitar being too heavy for me (which I now know to be incorrect) . It was just by pure chance that I tried out a LP Custom and realised they played as good as they looked.

In a video Chapper's did, he had just got himself one of the hollow-body LP's and I never knew they did stuff like that. I liked how aggressive it sounded with gain, due to it getting some epic controlled feedback.
 

Stigs

Well-Known Member
#32
Originally when I was on my mission to get myself a higher end model of a Gibson Les Paul, I really wanted to get the hollow body that doesn't have the "F" holes. I thought a lot of the back problems I was getting when playing my old LP Studio was due to the guitar being too heavy for me (which I now know to be incorrect) . It was just by pure chance that I tried out a LP Custom and realised they played as good as they looked.

In a video Chapper's did, he had just got himself one of the hollow-body LP's and I never knew they did stuff like that. I liked how aggressive it sounded with gain, due to it getting some epic controlled feedback.
They're some really nice guitars. Tim McIlrath from Rise Against has been playing one recently and I think it sounds killer!
 
Top