I've got wood!

The post about your new fret press brought me back to look at your fret tang removing solution where I noticed that you had not put a radius into the fretwire.
Did you radius the frets after removing the tangs or did you hammer them in as straight as they were=
 
It's an attempt to reduce the time spent levelling frets, which is a horribly tedious job.
You're using one of the Crimson levelling files, don't you?

I have never seen in nor used one of these in person. But as far as looking at the pictures on their webpage goes, the hone cut (is that the right word?) looks quite rough, even more so than the Rockinger leveling file.
Mind you, I could be completely wrong. But since I started using a metal beam( ground flat on a glass plate with 400/600 grit sandpaper glued on) for my fret levelling, the only thing the Rockinger file gets used for is filing back the excess fretends.
 
I don't have the levelling file but I have a couple of their levelling beams, of different lengths.

I recently - together with the nut slotting files - received one of their half-round files which are very good for stuff around the heel and cutaways. Also, my new belt sander arrived today and will be unboxed over the weekend, and I'm waiting for the fret press and other gubbins from Guitars & Woods.
 
A few bits and pieces today....firstly, I received a large package from Guitars and Woods. This is most of what it contained:
GNW 20171202.jpg
Not the keyboard...the big thing is the fret press, and the other things are the attachments for that, plus a few truss rods, several sets of frets, tweezers, a special crowning file and some shielding paint.

I also got this ziricote veneer...it looks great but it's very thin, so I will have to handle it with great care!
Ziricote veneer.jpg

Finally, I got my new band saw blade at last so I can now motor on. I'm preparing the neck for the wenge body that you've seen before....subject to approval from the client:
Neck laminates 2.jpg

I'm going to work on the other two this weekend too, and hope to make good progress!
 
You enjoy a good multi-laminate neck, don't you? ;)

...but come on- how come you post about unboxing a belt sander and have not shared any pictures yet?
Yup, I think they look good and they're stronger, so I think it's worth the effort to make them while I'm making guitars with no particular time pressure. This time, I tapered the piece in the centre of the neck to avoid a colour shift along the side. This is the neck for Sunrise, where I didn't do that and you can see the maple running out as the neck thins.
Neck side.jpg

The belt sander seems fine, and I actually used it for part of the shaping of that neck. I roughed it down with my Shinto rasp, and then used the belt to shape it some more. You have to be careful because it's very easy to go to far (which I may have done in one place), so I'll do the rest with sandpaper now. I might try using it for the first part of the radiusing process for the fretboard on the neck that's currently gluing up, since doing the whole process with a radius block is very time-consuming and tedious.
 
Yup, I think they look good and they're stronger, so I think it's worth the effort to make them while I'm making guitars with no particular time pressure.
Another thing for my ever-growing list.
This time, I tapered the piece in the centre of the neck to avoid a colour shift along the side. This is the neck for Sunrise, where I didn't do that and you can see the maple running out as the neck thins.
That's not a bad thing either. But probably harder to get it to look even on both sides, right?
I wonder how that would have looked with an asymmetrical neck profile?

I like multi-piece necks with wider "side pieces"- if that makes any sense- but that's just personal preference.

I might try using it for the first part of the radiusing process for the fretboard on the neck that's currently gluing up, since doing the whole process with a radius block is very time-consuming and tedious.
I'm probably going to stick with the handplane & sanding beam method, I found that relatively straightforward and easy.
 
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Did you get more information regarding the files?
Nothing very useful, I'll just have to work it out for myself. I wanted to do that this weekend but for various reasons haven't got around to it (one of which was a headache which put paid to my guitar labours for the afternoon).

The strat is dragging on and on....I'd made some pickup surrounds for it, but the first one broke while I was trying to fit it. I haven't yet worked out a solution - at the moment I'm trying to glue it back together but I don't really expect that to work. I had an ambitious list of tasks to do over the weekend, and I've only actually completed about 60% of them.
 
Damn, the problems with my guitar build just keep coming! This morning I've finally managed to get the pickups in the padauk strat - it doesn't look as nice as I wanted, but it'll do and maybe later I'll make new pickup surrounds.

So I come to fitting the bridge....it's a floating bridge with 6 screws, and as I'm screwing them in, the heads break off from three of the screws!!! Looking at them, they have a thinner neck, presumably to let the bridge move up and down freely there, but it creates a weak point that I hadn't expected.

I was fully intending to finish this bloody guitar today, but now I'll have to find somewhere to order new screws! I'm really annoyed about that.
 

johnniegoat

Stop, don’t, come back.
IMG_20171224_112907872.jpg IMG_20171224_112856249.jpg IMG_20171224_112850491.jpg

if you only use the outer 2 holes, you effectively get a 2 point trem

my one i put the screws through the trem plate then fixed with 2 short lengths of surgical tubing

then between the 2 holes being used i put some double sided tape on the body and fitted a small thin piece of sponge

i am not sure the sponge does anything, but the tubing creates tension, making sure the plate does not slip down the screw shafts - was having that problem when i first fitted it with no tubing

with locking tunders and a graphite nut the tuning stability if pretty spot on, even with some extreme usage
 
The big problem is the size of the holes...I carefully measured the screws with my calipers, and they come to about 3.1mm wide. I drilled holes 2.5mm wide, because I figure that 0.1mm is not enough to hold them properly, but they were tough to get in because the padauk is quite hard. I'm pretty sure that if I try to screw them in again, the same thing is going to happen with the others - it happened with the first ones when they were only half way in. It was a pain getting them out too, without a head, but fortunately I managed.

I moved on to making knobs (which I'm not yet sure if I will use)...need to take the dogs for a walk but hopefully later on I can at least sort out the wiring.
 
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