How loud do you play at home?

SemiCullen

Still haven't got the hang of Thursdays
#21
Mostly TV volume or headphones. When I'm home alone I will sometimes put in ear plugs and crank it up loud enough to really feel what I'm playing. Not too often, though.
 
#22
90cm from my monitors, inline with my head I'm hitting 84.3dB average with a max of 88.8dB. This is chugging and open broooootal 00000000s with my left hand holding my iPhone running a free app

I think I'll turn it down a smidge
 

mirage2101

Well-Known Member
#23
90cm from my monitors, inline with my head I'm hitting 84.3dB average with a max of 88.8dB. This is chugging and open broooootal 00000000s with my left hand holding my iPhone running a free app

I think I'll turn it down a smidge
I tried about the same and my peak is at 77db.. but mostly around the 60.. Then I thought that the difference is too big with my previous measurement and a different app says 88db.


What stands out to me is that actually most of us play at around this volume.
 

Chu

Well-Known Member
#25
At low volume, a pair of decent monitors cannot be beaten for filling the room at reasonable volume and of course can be fun with stereo effects.
I always have my Kemper through a small pair of 4" woofer Mackie monitors in addition to my 2x12 cab at home. Until the volume increases to a moderate level, the monitors sound way, way better. It just confirms my opinion that 12" speakers need to be moving a bit before they sound close to decent.
 

doctorpaul

Negative, Ghost Rider, the pattern is full.
Staff member
#26
It just confirms my opinion that 12" speakers need to be moving a bit before they sound close to decent.
Cant agree with that buddy (I run rather a lot of twelves) although our definition of ‘decent’ might not be the same ;)
I don’t think that there any need to crank the shit out of 12s.
 
#27
What position would be scientifically alright-ish to read the measurement from then? Like a meter out at ear height?
I must say I haven’t really thought that through. I just put my phone on a stool in front of my cab. The speaker’s centre is about 10 lower and the stool likely blocks the initial spike because that stands a bit in front to the side of the cab.
 
#28
@Rick - that’s what I did. I used ear height and moved from side to side while chugging.

I use monitors that are around 1m away from my head, you may be using something different but would suggest if you have any speaker aimed at your head to measure head level. Even with a cab, they sound best when you’re within the beam so would expect a small variance in sound level at my feet v head in this case.

If I remember later, I’ll check
 

mirage2101

Well-Known Member
#29
I suspect you’re right @mirage2101

Even at non antisocial volumes, over time, I’m sure 80dB or so isn’t going to do hearing much good.
If we assume that the phone apps are actually measuring 80db..
70db - passenger car at 65mph, vacuum cleaner, radio or tbv
80db - dishwasher, garbage disposal, food blender. - 2 times as loud as 70db, possible damage in 8 hours
90db - power mower, motorcycle at 25ft - 4 times as loud as 70db, damage likely in 8 hours
100db - farm tractor, jack hammer, garbage truck - 8 times as loud as 70db, serious damage possible in 8 hour exposure
110 live rock - 16 times as loud as 70db average human pain treshold
120 - chain saw - 32 times as loud, painfull
150 - eardrum rupture


I always have my Kemper through a small pair of 4" woofer Mackie monitors in addition to my 2x12 cab at home. Until the volume increases to a moderate level, the monitors sound way, way better. It just confirms my opinion that 12" speakers need to be moving a bit before they sound close to decent.
I feel my 12" cab is working fine as the lower volumes. I do compensate with higher bass. When I turn it up I have to adjust. But that goes for the 10"in my princeton too.
When I had a pod500 I used 1 8"powered speaker that was pretty ok at any volume. My smaller (not expensive) monitors didn't "feel" right. Sure you get guitar at a low volume but.. eh..
That said it's all subjective and depends a lot on what you can get away with. I use the katana head with 5" speaker for really quiet practice and if that was the volume I'd always have to use then I fully agree a 12"cab is way worse.
edit: curse you for mentioning kemper.. I wish those things were more affordable.
 
#30
I always have my Kemper through a small pair of 4" woofer Mackie monitors in addition to my 2x12 cab at home. Until the volume increases to a moderate level, the monitors sound way, way better. It just confirms my opinion that 12" speakers need to be moving a bit before they sound close to decent.
I need to get a solid state power amp to compare - first gas of 2019 :D

Maybe when I sell the last of my amps....
 

Chu

Well-Known Member
#31
I feel I chose my words poorly. I'm not saying that 12s need to be cranked to sound good. It's more a case that when they are played very quietly like I frequently do (my amp is in the adjoining bedroom in a semi detached house, not ideal for good neighbour behaviour in the evening should their kids be in bed) they aren't linear. There's definitely a point where you increase the volume and they suddenly wake up. My monitors don't do that and sound pretty full sounding at whisper levels.

It's also relevant that I'm using a digital amp. I can adjust the settings to compensate for the volume but I've created the patches to sound good in a band; Every time I change sounds I'd have to adjust them again so I don't.
 

mirage2101

Well-Known Member
#32
I feel I chose my words poorly. I'm not saying that 12s need to be cranked to sound good. It's more a case that when they are played very quietly like I frequently do (my amp is in the adjoining bedroom in a semi detached house, not ideal for good neighbour behaviour in the evening should their kids be in bed) they aren't linear. There's definitely a point where you increase the volume and they suddenly wake up. My monitors don't do that and sound pretty full sounding at whisper levels.

It's also relevant that I'm using a digital amp. I can adjust the settings to compensate for the volume but I've created the patches to sound good in a band; Every time I change sounds I'd have to adjust them again so I don't.
The non linear part is the killer. I’m lucky my house and that of the neighbors aren’t connected even though the houses are next to eachother. With the other neighbors we share the wall but because of the placement of the houses we don’t with the ones that I play guitar next to.
But with people sleeping there’s no way at all I’d get away with a 12”
 
#33
I feel I chose my words poorly. I'm not saying that 12s need to be cranked to sound good. It's more a case that when they are played very quietly like I frequently do (my amp is in the adjoining bedroom in a semi detached house, not ideal for good neighbour behaviour in the evening should their kids be in bed) they aren't linear. There's definitely a point where you increase the volume and they suddenly wake up. My monitors don't do that and sound pretty full sounding at whisper levels.

It's also relevant that I'm using a digital amp. I can adjust the settings to compensate for the volume but I've created the patches to sound good in a band; Every time I change sounds I'd have to adjust them again so I don't.
Makes perfect sense. Also, If you’re still using a kemper, the profile is at the optimum volume so the monitors recreate that at any volume through the monitors. The only difference is how the ear perceives volume differently.
I love using modelling kit and IRs for this reason. I love my Zella cabs and valve amps and they too sound great at any volume but at lower volume at home, I’m really into my axe at the mo.
 

ThePriseInferno

Well... does it?
#34
I'm running the IRT Studio with my Pod HD Pro X in the 4-cable method. The send from the Pod goes into the 1W input of the Laney, and then when I'm using the Laney as my amp sound the channel volumes are at 7/8 of the way up, but with the master volume on the Pod acting as a sort of pseudo-attenuator (usually between 1/3 to 1/2, sometimes up to 2/3 if I really want to RAWK). This means I can get the "cranked" power tube sound at lower volumes. Or, at least, that's how I perceive things to be.

Lately I've been sitting and playing more and so my ears are level with my 1x12, so I've been running at much lower volumes as a result. I'll try to get a dB rating tonight.
 
#36
Well, that was an interesting experiment. again using a free app, I averaged around 85-87dB, with a peak of just over 90dB. I wondered how the hell I didn't get more complaints from anyone, until I realised I am playing through studio monitors around 75cm away from my head, which are reasonably well isolated, and putting the phone just outside my door gave me a more understandable 74dB. I do think that creeps up when I'm jamming with a song or I'm playing for a longer time.

And of course, the trustworthiness of these apps are very debatable. I had a peak of 104dB when I moved the phone about a bit.
 
#37
Well, that was an interesting experiment. again using a free app, I averaged around 85-87dB, with a peak of just over 90dB. I wondered how the hell I didn't get more complaints from anyone, until I realised I am playing through studio monitors around 75cm away from my head, which are reasonably well isolated, and putting the phone just outside my door gave me a more understandable 74dB. I do think that creeps up when I'm jamming with a song or I'm playing for a longer time.

And of course, the trustworthiness of these apps are very debatable. I had a peak of 104dB when I moved the phone about a bit.
IIRC phone apps doesn't really work due to the way they process audio through the mic. I did a quick Google that said SoundMeter was considered one of the better apps, tried it and it measured my 2w amp @ vol.3 to about 75dB, cranked it and got 95dB, rolled back to the previous volume and got 85dB, added a fuzz pedal that kept the volume at the same level; 95dB again.

Would love to buy a proper decibel meter to actually keep volume at healthy levels (as opposed to what feels low enough) but that's a whole new can of worms to open when it comes to finding a good one.
 

Sustainerplayer

On the edge of breakup
#38
I can play louder than would be healthy if I wanted to - but I don't.

Somehow most of my hearing survived the foolishness of youth. I would like it to stay that way.

Nowadays I mostly play "loud" through studio monitors. I think it tops out around 75 dB +/- ...
 
#40
I screwed up my left ear in my 20s. I wish I could say because of concerts but it was machine noise at work.
At higher volumes and certain pitches my ear will get overdriven and sound crackly. It’s a pain in the ass at parties because it makes it difficult to follow a conversation to the left of me.

But it also made me watch my hearing more and limits the volume. As long as my ear isn’t acting up it’s soft enough :)

But getting a proper dB meter sounds like a good idea actually..
 
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