Home Amps: Features versus Weight

Aleene

Praise The Sun!
#81
If something goes wrong with an amp this big and heavy, then I am helpless. If something goes wrong with an amp which is neither too big nor too heavy for me, then I can do something about it. You learn things being born disabled, and one of them is not to put yourself in such a situation.

As Harry Callahan said, “a man has to know his limitations.”
No that's not what I mean

Maybe it should be framed like;

Is there any reason something is likely to go wrong with your amp within the next... year? 2 years?

If the answer is no then there's no problem. All you're doing is constructing a self destructive argument within your own mind.
If the answer is Yes, then start taking steps towards getting some help with it. Let's look at the obvious first - how did you get the amp there in the first place?
 

Chu

Well-Known Member
#82
:mad:

This is as angry as I have been since one of my inventions showed up in a Kickstarter campaign (no subterfuge involved, just seven billion humans on the planet). I have addressed this point already, and it is tremendously insulting. How the fuck does a willingness to be without one's dream amp constitute “uncontrollable GAS?!”

The chances are good that I could sell the Sig:X for what I paid, possibly more than I paid. As to paying someone to move the amp, I have spent enough time dependent on others to know that any plan which absolutely requires someone else to perform a critical task is not a good plan, unless said task is that person's business—which still might make it a bad plan, as I would have to ensure that I could afford to pay that person (I shave my head with a $30 Wahl trimmer because there have been months in which I could not afford to pay for a haircut). The symptoms I manage and the fatigue they cause prevent me from developing relationships with my neighbors, and I doubt that I need to explain why intractable pain can lead to isolation.
My post was never meant to cause offence, I never criticised you, only offering my thoughts on what I see as an unhealthy cycle. It was my first post in the topic and whilst I'd read the full thread, I was still referring mostly to your opening post and to an extent, Lone Star's.

I've reread my post and stand by what I've said. As that has caused you so much anger and insult, I'll just move on.
 

Robstafarian

The Good and Wise Call Me “Rufus”
#83
Let's look at the obvious first - how did you get the amp there in the first place?
UPS delivered it, and the driver was kind enough to put it in my living room rather than simply on the porch. My father then carried it into this room. It is important that my plans not depend on him.
 

Robstafarian

The Good and Wise Call Me “Rufus”
#84
As that has caused you so much anger and insult, I'll just move on.
No need to move on, mate. I am not trying to silence or exile anyone.

The cycle you have seen can be attributed to what I discussed recently: I rarely have money to spare, and I tend to lose track of important factors whilst I am without money. As one example, the Jackson JS1X Dinky Minion has proved itself to be even better for me than the Fender Offset Mustang 90: I bought the Mustang 90 because I forgot about the Dinky Minion. I would rather sell the Mustang 90 and have the money to mod the Dinky Minion than keep the Mustang 90 and not play it.
 

Robstafarian

The Good and Wise Call Me “Rufus”
#87
@Robstafarian if you were to pick your dream amp right now, what would it be?
Every amp which is on my list of “dream amps” is too big and heavy for me, and I do not want to make this mistake again. As such, a better question would be: “Were you to buy an amp right now, what would you buy?”

The answer to that question is the Victory Sheriff 22, with the budget option being the Orange Jim Root Terror and the cheapest option being the Randall RD5 ($969, $630, and $300 respectively). The Randall RD5 has the closest gain sound to the Fryette, though it is less versatile than the other two amps. The cheaper two amps definitely have four gain stages, whilst I think the Victory might have five—its manual does not have a “tube layout” page.
 

Lone Star

Well-Known Member
#88
Every amp which is on my list of “dream amps” is too big and heavy for me, and I do not want to make this mistake again. As such, a better question would be: “Were you to buy an amp right now, what would you buy?”

The answer to that question is the Victory Sheriff 22, with the budget option being the Orange Jim Root Terror and the cheapest option being the Randall RD5 ($969, $630, and $300 respectively). The Randall RD5 has the closest gain sound to the Fryette, though it is less versatile than the other two amps. The cheaper two amps definitely have four gain stages, whilst I think the Victory might have five—its manual does not have a “tube layout” page.
Then make it your mission to get the Victory. Buy it, play it, love it. If you're not heading to gigs or band practices with it who gives a shit how big it is?

If it's a stay at home amp then buy the best damn rig you can afford. Your happiness at home isn't any less important than a musician who earns a living from his/her music.
 

Robstafarian

The Good and Wise Call Me “Rufus”
#89
This has brought me back to this train of thought. First, though, I will post what I forgot to add to this thread yesterday.

As I noted recently, the Fender Bassbreaker 007 combo has been coming to mind a lot recently. It is a really interesting prospect: a low-power, single-ended Class A plexi in a lightweight package which breaks up earlier due to its EL84 power tube and has more even-order harmonics due to its power amp architecture. Yesterday, I decided that I would buy one in the spring and A/B it against my Sig:X with a variety of clean and dirty settings; the idea was that I would sell my Sig:X and my Big Bottom cab if the Bassbreaker proved suitable, as that would net me ≈$750 and improve my monthly budget by $90.24 (5–7 months earlier than would otherwise be the case). That comparison would be less about amp features and more about the interaction between my Dinky Minion and the amps, as the Dinky Minion's 416 tonal options and two-band EQ may well grant the Bassbreaker significantly more versatility, though the necessity of running my delay pedal in front of the amp would factor into the decision as well.

The situation described in the initially linked post has brought that into sharper focus, however. If I exchange my CabGrabber for the CabGrabber XL, then I would have to sell the CabGrabber XL—which I doubt people would be willing to pay extra for—with the cab and buy a CabGrabber for the Bassbreaker combo. That would not be the end of the world, obviously, it just has me thinking of the path from this juncture more concretely.

The 90-day weather forecast has changed, significantly, in my favor such that it should be viable to ship sold gear through the end of January if not the end of February. As such, I will go ahead and list both my PRS SE 50 and my Midas Venice U16 on Reverb; I still need to look into becoming a Reverb Preferred Seller first, however, as that would decrease the fees I pay and allow my customers to finance purchases via Affirm (the way I financed my Sig:X). The PRS should cover the cost of the Bassbreaker, and the Midas should get me the Stetsbar for my Dinky Minion with a few hundred dollars to spare.
 
#90
This has brought me back to this train of thought. First, though, I will post what I forgot to add to this thread yesterday.

As I noted recently, the Fender Bassbreaker 007 combo has been coming to mind a lot recently. It is a really interesting prospect: a low-power, single-ended Class A plexi in a lightweight package which breaks up earlier due to its EL84 power tube and has more even-order harmonics due to its power amp architecture. Yesterday, I decided that I would buy one in the spring and A/B it against my Sig:X with a variety of clean and dirty settings; the idea was that I would sell my Sig:X and my Big Bottom cab if the Bassbreaker proved suitable, as that would net me ≈$750 and improve my monthly budget by $90.24 (5–7 months earlier than would otherwise be the case). That comparison would be less about amp features and more about the interaction between my Dinky Minion and the amps, as the Dinky Minion's 416 tonal options and two-band EQ may well grant the Bassbreaker significantly more versatility, though the necessity of running my delay pedal in front of the amp would factor into the decision as well.

The situation described in the initially linked post has brought that into sharper focus, however. If I exchange my CabGrabber for the CabGrabber XL, then I would have to sell the CabGrabber XL—which I doubt people would be willing to pay extra for—with the cab and buy a CabGrabber for the Bassbreaker combo. That would not be the end of the world, obviously, it just has me thinking of the path from this juncture more concretely.

The 90-day weather forecast has changed, significantly, in my favor such that it should be viable to ship sold gear through the end of January if not the end of February. As such, I will go ahead and list both my PRS SE 50 and my Midas Venice U16 on Reverb; I still need to look into becoming a Reverb Preferred Seller first, however, as that would decrease the fees I pay and allow my customers to finance purchases via Affirm (the way I financed my Sig:X). The PRS should cover the cost of the Bassbreaker, and the Midas should get me the Stetsbar for my Dinky Minion with a few hundred dollars to spare.
I personally looooove the 007 combo. Sounds lovely and very similar to it's Marshall big brother at lower volumes. Something you should wholeheartedly check out given the above reasoning :)
 

Robstafarian

The Good and Wise Call Me “Rufus”
#96
My combo cabinet design efforts have revealed that I will have to settle for a head and cab, both substantially more portable than my current rig. As such, this has returned to my mind:
I am really getting excited by the prospect of having a 12.5 pound Orange Jim Root Terror, a 24 pound 1x12 loaded with a Weber Gray Wolf, and a Weber MicroMASS attenuator. If I ever played out (even jamming with friends), then that would be a spastic-compatible, one-trip load (with the Dinky Minion)!
The more expensive version thereof swaps the Orange Jim Root Terror for a Victory Sheriff 22, adding ≈$240 ($340, minus the cost of the Weber MicroMASS).
 

Robstafarian

The Good and Wise Call Me “Rufus”
#97
I am now seriously considering the Laney L5 Studio, which would save approximately $30 over the Orange strategy described above.
 

cat-the-odd

On the other side of your screen
#98
Hi Rob,

I recently slid into bass playing, again. I took my cheapy bass and play the previous bassist's amp. I don't tweak the EQ nor the gain - Simply plugging in with a tuner (a nice mute switch, haha).
My urge to buy a new bass and to buy my own amp rig is there, but comparably on a really low level. Refreshing, actually, as I tend to learn songs and play more.

You got a guitar and an amp. Go make some cool noise! Use that brain sauces to learn songs, licks & scales and to build up your muscle memory. Save your money for important things that will improve your life more than switching amps.

My two cents.
Cheers from Germany!
 

Robstafarian

The Good and Wise Call Me “Rufus”
#99
Save your money for important things that will improve your life more than switching amps.
My poverty makes significant savings impractical if not impossible: my average monthly net income thus far this year is $39, including a few months with a negative net income. The only way I can raise a significant amount of money within a year is to sell my Sig:X for a less expensive amp, which is why I keep putting the Victory Sheriff 22 to the back of my mind in favor of less expensive options.

Be sure to make a thread, or PM me, before you buy a bass rig.
 
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