Crazy 12-string build

#42
I'm working towards a colour scheme that I have in mind... :D

...but that's still a long way away, with much work to be done before I reach that stage! Tonight's little side-track was a diversion while I wait for my new router bit which will allow me to carry on working on the neck.
 

Robstafarian

The Good and Wise Call Me “Rufus”
#43
@GloopyJon

afaik, the f holes will have an effect.

without f holes, the air in the guitar is by and large held in place. so the body resonates, but the air does not move as much. i think this helps avoid unwanted feedback at high volumes

i think this was the concept on the gretsches with the painted on f holes and the gibson Lucille guitar
This is correct, as I discussed with GloopyJon months ago.
what some people consider feedback, others consider sustain. Clapton never seemed to mind his 335 going through a stack of marshalls playing for Cream
An ES-335 has a center block, which significantly changes the feedback-inducing dynamics. Fully-hollow guitars, including the PRS Hollowbody 12 which inspired this build, are significantly more susceptible to feedback.
 
#45
An ES-335 has a center block, which significantly changes the feedback-inducing dynamics. Fully-hollow guitars, including the PRS Hollowbody 12 which inspired this build, are significantly more susceptible to feedback.
It's true that a particular PRS inspired this one, even though my guitar will have a centre block (see previous pages). That's mainly because I think it's easier than a fully hollow construction, which I don't know how to achieve.
 

Robstafarian

The Good and Wise Call Me “Rufus”
#46
@Robstafarian

that is true - though the neck tenon on this build goes righ tthrough to theb bridge, so in effect its more akin to the 335 than PRS
It's true that a particular PRS inspired this one, even though my guitar will have a centre block (see previous pages). That's mainly because I think it's easier than a fully hollow construction, which I don't know how to achieve.
It is a fair cop; when one's sleep is fucked, something else has to give.
 
#49
Quiet weekend in general, so a busy weekend working on guitars! I might post something later depending on how much I get done today. On this guitar, yesterday I finished the truss rod channel and glued the fretboard onto the neck.

I've also finished editing the third episode in the series of build videos for this guitar. I'm not sure how many more I will make - I think at least two more, although I'm not going to show all of the stages that you do on every guitar, like the fret work. I'm trying to focus on the bits that are unusual and specific to this guitar.
 
#51
I haven't made an update here for a while, partly because of the issues about uploading pictures to the forum which still aren't resolved. However, I've just discovered that I can use the image tag to link in an image from my website (gloopyguitars.com), so that solves the problem!

The latest update is that I've glued the neck into the body. In doing so, I've realised that there are a few issues with the neck itself. I seem to have carved the heel too far back, which means that I had to carve away some of the back of the body, and there are gaps that I will have to fill (not visible in the picture below). I also shouldn't have cut out the lower part of the centre block, because I'm now going to have to make the pickup cavities as shallow as possible to keep enough wood going through the neck to hold it all stable. This is compounded by the fact that the centre block is not wide enough either - the pickup cavities will span the entire width. I'm contemplating whether to glue extra bits down the side to add strength, although I don't think it should be necessary if I can keep a reasonable thickness below the pickups (close to 1cm).

Anyway, you live and learn, and nothing so far appears to be a real killer. Since the interior will not be accessible once the top is glued on, yesterday I fitted the output socket in place and soldered the cables to it. I also have a little post at the top whose purpose is to reinforce the thin strip of wood that goes across the sound hole, and prevent that from breaking if it ever gets hit by accident.

I have also prepared the top by cutting out the space for the fretboard, and then I discovered that I needed to do something because the centre block is higher than the sides of the guitar, so it wouldn't glue down flat. I decided to rout out a corresponding area to a couple of millimetres of depth, and now it fits on reasonably well. I think I should probably install and work on the frets before I actually glue the top on, so I think that's the next job. I also need to think about the headstock, where more surprises could lie waiting!

Anyway, here's a picture linked in from my website. I will try to take a few more pictures to post in the near future.
 

Robstafarian

The Good and Wise Call Me “Rufus”
#52
I haven't made an update here for a while, partly because of the issues about uploading pictures to the forum which still aren't resolved. However, I've just discovered that I can use the image tag to link in an image from my website (gloopyguitars.com), so that solves the problem!
Sorry, I thought I had suggested that (when mentioning that I use my site).
 
#56
This evening I've cut the frets and resawn the fret slots - I generally do the slots first before the board is radiused, and then cut them to depth in a second pass. There is some method to this madness, in that the first pass ensures that the slots are cut in the right position (using a fret slot ruler) and perfectly straight and vertical (using a little sawing jig), and the second one ensures the depth using a little attachment that fits onto the saw blade. The depth attachment doesn't go in the jig. Anyhoo...!

I also rounded the edges of the fretboard to make them more comfortable - what's often called "rolled edges".

However, before ploughing ahead and installing the frets, I need to take a step back and decide what inlays to make. Although it's always exciting to go quickly and see the progress, I'm thinking of possibly doing a more elaborate set of inlays. One thought is a simplified kind of tree of life - more of a twig of life, really, with just a branch going down the fretboard and leaves on each of the marked frets (3, 5, 7 etc.).

Any other suggestions are welcome! :)
 
#57
Here are some more pictures of what I've mentioned in previous posts. Firstly, the heel where the neck enters the body. You can see that I carved away some of the back plate, and even bits of the sides, to get a reasonably smooth transition. Unfortunately, I've left myself with gaps on the sides of the neck which will need to be filled with something - probably just some sawdust and glue.


Next is the other side, showing the end of the fretboard. There are a few spots on the fretboard where the ebony tore out a bit. These were filled with superglue but currently would still be partially visible after the installation of the frets. This is partly what has made me think about inlays, as a way to hide these issues.

Note also the scoop on the lower cutaway for high fret access, which will be continued into the top after that has been glued on!


Lastly, here's the body from another angle, showing the jack socket, which has been successfully installed (bit of a shame to hide some of the blocks with a large, chrome plate, but nvm). This also shows the centre block, with the holes that I drilled for poking wires through but which may in the end not be needed, and the part that I cut out on the bottom. That has proven to be a mistake, since I'm in a bit of trouble for routing out the pickup cavities and leaving enough wood to provide a solid neck to withstand the string tension. Musifications are under way on that subject.


In case you missed this in earlier posts, the large, red blocks by the wires will support the control plate, and the little pole on the other side of the body will support the thin piece of wood that splits the sound hole in two, to try to protect it against breakage.
 

DrHankWanfordSnr

That's not new, its always been there.
#59
Here are some more pictures of what I've mentioned in previous posts. Firstly, the heel where the neck enters the body. You can see that I carved away some of the back plate, and even bits of the sides, to get a reasonably smooth transition. Unfortunately, I've left myself with gaps on the sides of the neck which will need to be filled with something - probably just some sawdust and glue.


Next is the other side, showing the end of the fretboard. There are a few spots on the fretboard where the ebony tore out a bit. These were filled with superglue but currently would still be partially visible after the installation of the frets. This is partly what has made me think about inlays, as a way to hide these issues.

Note also the scoop on the lower cutaway for high fret access, which will be continued into the top after that has been glued on!


Lastly, here's the body from another angle, showing the jack socket, which has been successfully installed (bit of a shame to hide some of the blocks with a large, chrome plate, but nvm). This also shows the centre block, with the holes that I drilled for poking wires through but which may in the end not be needed, and the part that I cut out on the bottom. That has proven to be a mistake, since I'm in a bit of trouble for routing out the pickup cavities and leaving enough wood to provide a solid neck to withstand the string tension. Musifications are under way on that subject.


In case you missed this in earlier posts, the large, red blocks by the wires will support the control plate, and the little pole on the other side of the body will support the thin piece of wood that splits the sound hole in two, to try to protect it against breakage.
The gaps between the body and the neck - would slivers of veneer be a solution - turn a booboo into a featur ?
 
#60
The gaps between the body and the neck - would slivers of veneer be a solution - turn a booboo into a featur ?
I'll have a think about that, thanks for the idea. Yes, it's probably going to be better to glue in a little sliver of something. Good suggestion!

Talking of veneers, this evening I've glued a maple veneer onto the headstock which I think will go with the rest of the guitar (don't tell @johnniegoat but it's an offcut from the top of his guitar!). I'm also still thinking about the inlays, and leaning towards doing something complicated. However, guitar-building will stop now for a few days because we have visitors arriving tomorrow.
 
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