Changing the strings on a strat.

Owwwccchhh

Active Member
#1
Okay guys. I am having major problems changing the strings on my strat. My high e string broke and I can not figure out how to get the trem to stop pulling up off the body when I tune the guitar up. I don't know how to use the higher string gauge that I bought.

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Robstafarian

The Good and Wise Call Me “Rufus”
#2
The higher gauge strings are putting more tension on the neck and the bridge. Since the bridge is held down by springs, the string tension is simply stretching the springs. You can add more tension to the bridge block by either increasing the number of springs or tightening the screws which hold the bridge claw on the other end of the springs.

 

Owwwccchhh

Active Member
#3
Oh. Well. I need five springs probably then, as I already screwed the claw in fairly far. I've put it in drop c for now, but later on I'll add a few more. I got my bridge set up well though.

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Robstafarian

The Good and Wise Call Me “Rufus”
#4
Oh. Well. I need five springs probably then, as I already screwed the claw in fairly far. I've put it in drop c for now, but later on I'll add a few more. I got my bridge set up well though.
What string gauges are you using? Five strings is one hell of a lot of tension.
 

Rurin

Well-Known Member
#8
You need to adust the trem claw springs and the tuning on the guitar by litle steps. Bring the strings near to pitch and adjust the tension on the trem springs. You will have to repeat severall times untill you find the balance between the strings and the spring tension.

Carrefull with the trem screws.

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Tetanus

Well-Known Member
#9
You need to adust the trem claw springs and the tuning on the guitar by litle steps. Bring the strings near to pitch and adjust the tension on the trem springs. You will have to repeat severall times untill you find the balance between the strings and the spring tension.

Carrefull with the trem screws.

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I would use a different method. Like some use with the Floyd system.
Block the trem in the flat (parallel with body) position, restring, tune, stretch the strings, tune, stretch them again, tune again, then carefully unblock the trem, adjust the trem claws in the back cavity till the trem is in flat (parallel with body) again.
Double check the tuning, do some fine adjustments.
 

Tetanus

Well-Known Member
#10
10-52's

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10-52 in drop C could give you sloppy, low tension. But certainly should not give you enough tension to use 5 trem springs.
10-52 is more drop-D set for me. Or just a tight low-E string.

Joke:
Are you sure you did not tune the guitar to an octave upper then you wanted? :)
 
#14
Note what Rurin stated earlier:
You need to adjust the trem claw springs and the tuning on the guitar by little steps. Bring the strings near to pitch and adjust the tension on the trem springs. You will have to repeat several times until you find the balance between the strings and the spring tension.
Do small adjustments. Tune. See where it's at. Adjust again, if needed. Tune. Etc.
 
#15
http://diystrat.blogspot.com/2011/08/setting-up-or-adjusting-stratocaster.html

I'm no expert, as I only own hardtails, but the screws attaching the tremolo to the cavity look like they are barely screwed in.

EDIT: I think these are the claw screws.
Ya, this is exactly the problem. You are going to want to tighten the screws that are attached to the metal spring board until the trem is positioned where you want it. Personally I love having the trem float like it is in your picture, you can flutter with the bar and use it to bend notes upwards by pulling up on the bar.
 
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