Beginner's purchase

Discussion in 'Beginners' started by Resende, Jun 9, 2017.

  1. Resende

    Resende New Member

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    Hi all!
    I love blues and I've always wanted to play guitar but I never really got a chance to practice it.
    I have an old acoustic guitar which I've been playing for the past 2 weeks. It's a nylon acoustic guitar (not really expensive) that has been sitting for about 10-15 years, it was my dad's.
    I can still tune the strings using an app on my phone, but I'm pretty sure I have to buy new ones.
    The thing is, I really want to play blues and specifically on an electric guitar which will be my next purchase.

    So, a few questions:

    1- I'm about to go out and buy some new acoustic guitar strings (while I figure out the electric guitar purchase) and I was looking at the D'Addario EJ15 Phosphore Bronze 10 gauge strings. Is it appropriate for what I need? The head it's this type.

    2- While I still practice the acoustic guitar I'm looking into spending around €200-250 on an electric guitar. I looked at the squier starters pack which has an affinity strat and a 10G frontman amp, plus a few accessories. From what I've read the squier lineup is really low-end, with the affinity being around the middle tier of squiers, but I can't really find anything comparable for that price. The classic vibe is way over budget for now.
    Do you guys have any recomendations for that price bracket?

    Cheers guys.
     
    ten-foot-tryptych likes this.
  2. Robstafarian

    Robstafarian The Good and Wise Call Me “Rufustarian” Staff Member

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    No, it is not appropriate to use phosphor-bronze strings on a nylon-string acoustic guitar.
    Where do you live?

    I almost forgot! Welcome to the forum! Please, introduce yourself.
     
  3. Resende

    Resende New Member

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    Sorry for the long delay!
    And thank you for your feedback, I went out and bought this.
    Restringing was challenging as it was my first time but it's all working!
    One thing that I noticed was that the strings keep getting out of tune really fast. I mean, in seconds.
    I tune it, when I finish the high E the other E is out of tune already. I tuned at least 20 times and it's still out of tune. I'm assuming it's the strings getting stretched? I hope it's normal.

    About my location I'm from Portugal ;)

    Edit: I can't add the URL for the image of the product that I bought. Don't know why...
    But it's the D'Addario Classical Nylon - Normal Tension (red box)
     
  4. Robstafarian

    Robstafarian The Good and Wise Call Me “Rufustarian” Staff Member

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    I think you should take the guitar to a tech for a setup.
    I will bear that in mind when discussing gear with you; it would help if you added your location to your profile. At some point, you should create a new thread in the Gear section to discuss your electric guitar plans and budget.
     
  5. ed lespaul

    ed lespaul Well-Known Member

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    I'm a little confused. Are you talking about the Nylon string guitar, or an electric guitar?

    If it's the nylon, you'll be tuning it for a week unless you stretch the strings. Another cause could be that the strings are slipping. Did you wrap the strings around and back through the string hole?

    If it's an electric, is it a floating bridge? If it is, check youtube for tutorials on restringing. You'll need to learn how to tune it. Once you learn, it's a piece of cake.


     
  6. Resende

    Resende New Member

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    It's a classical guitar, nylon strings.
    I followed a youtube video and got it working. I tied at the bottom first then stretched to the head and through the string hole and tied there, then I wrapped the string as if I was tuning it.
    I've been seeing less and less stretch on the strings lately. On the first couple of days it would be WAY stretched. On the guitar tuna app that I use to tune, the fat strings were at -40 -60 while the light ones were -100 -120. It was really crazy. Now I can have a session without tuning them at least. I do have to tune them every day though, they will be at -10 -15.

    But I'm loving it so far! The only thing that I noticed is how fat the fret size is. It's really hard to stretch my hand over 3 frets, say a C major, without being really uncomfortable. It's a really wide neck, I think 51mm, as oppose to 41 or 43mm.
    I was watching some youtube videos and how easily they planted their fingers on the fret board and I just couldn't for the life of me. Then after tracking their finger and hand position and mimic it I realised that they just had a smaller fretboard. But oh well, learning is fun :)
     
  7. Robstafarian

    Robstafarian The Good and Wise Call Me “Rufustarian” Staff Member

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    We should discuss neck geometry before you buy an electric guitar: I experimented a lot before I learned my requirements. A few months ago, I taught my father what I had learned; he now has a neck which suits his needs very well.
     
  8. I demand satisfaction

    I demand satisfaction Well-Known Member

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    S0, in terms of introduction, it's hard for you to fret a C chord, but are you 12 years old, 16 years old, 30 years old? These all influence the next step in terms of guitar purchase. You've got a classical acoustic to play right now, so I'd recommend building up some finger strength and dexterity on that, then go check out some electrics. For €250, maybe get a Squier Vintage Modified or Affinity Strat and use a computer and headphones to play with until you can afford a proper amp. They're decent enough guitars to use for years. Maybe you can save up for a Roland CUBE, Boss Katana or Fender Mustang for your first amp after you buy a decent guitar.

    EDIT: Or for amps, a Laney Cub8 valve combo is € 129 from Thomann.
     
  9. I demand satisfaction

    I demand satisfaction Well-Known Member

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  10. GloopyJon

    GloopyJon Woof!

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    Hi there, and welcome!

    Your budget for an electric guitar is a little bit low to guarantee getting a good one, but if you choose carefully you should be OK. Although they look great, I'd avoid the Harley Benton branded guitars at Thomann, because a friend of mine bought one and it had some bad problems with the frets. From what I gather, some of them are fine, and very good value for money, but there are too many problems like that for me to be happy recommending them.

    Squiers should be fine as a strat-style guitar, but if you prefer a Les Paul type, then have a look at the Epiphones, which have a good reputation. The Slash AFD Epiphone is apparently a great guitar for a beginner, for example, but there are lots of other options if you pay slightly more.

    Good luck choosing one, and have fun!
     
  11. Lone Star

    Lone Star www.screlics.co.uk

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    Hi @Resende and welcome. Good to see a newbie who isn't interested in the Chapman Guitars sub forum!

    Okay. I was teaching beginners guitar for 12 years until a few months back. Common problem? Wrong guitar. Everyone was coming to me with nylon classical guitars yet they wanted to play rock. Half the battle? The right tools. And your budget is adequate to get a nice first electric guitar.

    My advice? Buy this : https://m.thomann.de/gb/fender_squier_affinity_strat_rw_bsb.htm?o=21&search=1497725760

    You'll have a few € left over as well to buy an iRig (assuming you have a smart phone or iPhone etc...). You could download the Jamup app and practice via a set of headphones.

    I'm not saying get rid of the classical guitar but perhaps getting a nice electric will help you advance properly.
     
    beans & rice likes this.
  12. Magnus Pym

    Magnus Pym Grudges rot the soul

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    Hello. You could do worse than look at the Yamaha Pacifica range too.
     
    Last edited: Jun 19, 2017 at 2:58 PM
  13. beans & rice

    beans & rice Well-Known Member

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    Howdy.

    I got back into playing a few years back, first using my old acoustics, and then buying the same Squier Affinity starter pack you mentioned. It's actually a decent guitar, and I still have it. Feels good, very easy to play. I made a few adjustments for my personal tastes. And I now keep it tuned to Open D for practicing with a slide.

    I was never much interested in playing blues originally, but I've come to realize it's fun stuff. And the Squier is the most accommodating guitar I have for blues and Southern fried guitar.
     
  14. Robstafarian

    Robstafarian The Good and Wise Call Me “Rufustarian” Staff Member

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    If you decide to try some of the gear suggested in this thread, then take notes and tell us your findings before purchasing a guitar and/or amp. There is much to discuss prior to said purchases, lest you waste time and money with gear you could have known would not suit you (I regret having lost both).
     
    Magnus Pym likes this.

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