BBQ Recipes

SemiCullen

Still haven't got the hang of Thursdays
#1
Figured we could start a new thread for various recipes regarding barbecuing and grilling.

I'm going to start with a couple of sauce recipes. These are both clone recipes of a couple of very popular competition-style sauces. I will provide the base recipe and I will tell you how I vary from that recipe. These are both very popular in my household and I keep a bottle of each on in the fridge all the time.

Sweet Barbecue Sauce

2 cups light brown sugar, packed
1.5 cups ketchup
1/2 cup+2T+2t or 5/8 Cups apple cider vinegar
5T+1t white sugar (granulated)
2t Morton kosher salt
1T+1t chili powder
heaping 2t ground black pepper, not too fine, not too coarse
2T+2t Worcestershire
16 drops vanilla (1/16+- teaspoon)
1/2t granulated garlic
1/2t allspice
1t cayenne

In a saucepan over low heat combine the ketchup (by which I guess I should point out that mean American red ketchup/catsup and not any European variety), apple cider vinegar, and brown sugar and stir occasionally until the brown sugar is well incorporated and all sugar granules are gone. Add the rest of your ingredients and bring the mixture to a simmer. Remove from heat and allow to cool. I store my sauce in empty ketchup bottles or Mason jars.

I couldn't find my revision of this recipe. I'd converted the standard measures to weights, so I'm a bit upset I can't find it. Anyway, this will work and you can adjust seasonings to your liking. This sauce is sweet, so you don't have to use a ton of it when you glaze ribs or add bit to some pulled pork. After making a batch, you can also cut some down with more apple cider vinegar if that's to your liking. I use two to three times the cayenne because I like my sauce spicier.

Tennessee Red Sauce

1 Cup - Apple Cider Vinegar
1 Cup - Ketchup
2 Cups - White sugar (granulated)
1 Tbl - Coarse ground black pepper
1 tsp - Coarse kosher salt
1 tsp - Crushed red pepper flakes
1/4 tsp - Allspice

Combine all ingredients in a sauce pan over low heat. Stir until the sugar crystals are all incorporated. Bring to a simmer. Remove from heat. Cool and store.

I know this looks like a lot of sugar, but unless you're a fan of Carolina sauces or other vinegar-heavy condiments, you're going to need it to balance out the tanginess. I usually start with 1 cup of white sugar (or sometimes I'll use Turbinado if I'm in the mood) and adjust as necessary. I also use WAY more red pepper flakes. Like, I use about 1/4 - 1/2 a cup for this size recipe, but you adjust to your taste.

This is my very favorite sauce. It is a good blend between a standard Kansas City-style sweet sauce and a Carolina vinegar sauce. A traditional Carolina sauce is just apple cider vinegar, red pepper flakes, coarse ground black pepper, and kosher salt. By adding in the ketchup, sugar and allspice you bring in those more common elements of what people think of when they think of a barbecue sauce. Together, the end product is more watery than your typical barbecue sauce, but still significantly thicker than just cider vinegar with spices.
 

mirage2101

Well-Known Member
#3
Looking good!!!

I just found this recipe:
https://thetakeout.com/recipe-char-siu-chinese-barbecue-pork-1829157660
The downside is that it's full of hard to get chinese ingredients so I'm going to look for more western friendly alternatives...


This is a favorite of mine:
https://bbq-helden.nl/recepten/cheapo-burnt-ends/
"Burnt ends" made from pork belly for when you don't want to go through the hassle of doing a whole brisket.
It's in ditch so you'll probably need google translate. i'd be happy to answer questions.
Essentially: Cure, smoky, dice, rub, sauce.
And then watch them evaporate when they hit the table.
 

SemiCullen

Still haven't got the hang of Thursdays
#4
It is not very difficult for me to get full packer briskets here, and about the same price for a full brisket as I have to pay for pork belly (because the only pork bellies I can get are two full bellies packaged together). I'll occasionally buy pork belly to make homemade bacon or porchetta, but it's such a hassel to prepare I've fallen out of the habit. I do make buckboard bacon (which is basically cured pork shoulder) now and then.

This is how I like to make burnt ends:




I used to cook the full thing until I hit about 170F internal and then separate the point, but I never got the end results I wanted. Now I separate the point and chunk it before cooking. The chunks go on a couple of baking racks and onto the smoker. The flat goes on the grill rack above the chunks (that's where the WSM comes in handy having the two cooking levels). The chunks and the flat are cooked for around four hours (until they get the kind of bark I want) and then wrapped in unwaxed butcher paper. The butcher paper helps protect the meat from getting burned, but is also semi-permeable so the bark doesn't get all soft like it does if you wrap in foil. They'll stay wrapped until done cooking -- another 3-4 hours. This is cooking around 300F, mind you.
 

SemiCullen

Still haven't got the hang of Thursdays
#6
A lot of folks recommend cooking some really fatty meats first to help season your pit. Like pork belly or something like that. Otherwise, I think pork butt is probably the best way to get to know your cooker. It has a relatively lengthy cook time and a wide margin for error.
 

mirage2101

Well-Known Member
#8
Phase 1 is done.
Smoked pork belly.


4,5 hours on the new ceramic as a practice cook. I overshot the temprature because I was working with the meat but thankfully the ceramic hadn't heated up yet. Because I started too late it's in the fridge now. Later this week it 'll be cut up, covered in rub back on the bbq to caremalize and then covered in bbq sauce.
 

SemiCullen

Still haven't got the hang of Thursdays
#9
Phase 1 is done.
Smoked pork belly.


4,5 hours on the new ceramic as a practice cook. I overshot the temprature because I was working with the meat but thankfully the ceramic hadn't heated up yet. Because I started too late it's in the fridge now. Later this week it 'll be cut up, covered in rub back on the bbq to caremalize and then covered in bbq sauce.
That looks excellent. Smoked pork belly is awesome.
 
#10
Phase 1 is done.
Smoked pork belly.


4,5 hours on the new ceramic as a practice cook. I overshot the temprature because I was working with the meat but thankfully the ceramic hadn't heated up yet. Because I started too late it's in the fridge now. Later this week it 'll be cut up, covered in rub back on the bbq to caremalize and then covered in bbq sauce.
Hmm, it’s been a while since I last visited Amsterdam...!;)
 

SemiCullen

Still haven't got the hang of Thursdays
#12
I smoked a brisket and a ham for Thanksgiving, but didn't take a picture of either. They both turned out great. I tell you what was really awesome -- the finishing sauce I made for the brisket. I started with a demi glace base (it was a concentrate that I reconstituted with low-sodium beef stock), added extra beef stock to get the consistency more watery, then added Worcestershire sauce and sweet red Vermouth until I was happy with the flavor (for three cups of sauce, it was probably a tablespoon or so of Worcestershire and 1/4 cup of Vermouth). Once the brisket is done, slice up what you're going to eat and pour the finishing sauce over the slices until you have them pretty well covered. It just adds a bit more umami punch.
 

mirage2101

Well-Known Member
#14
Since the sun is out and I'll have some time for the weekend.. I'm going to try my hand at spareribs.

I'm thinking babyback ribs, dry rub them, wait an hour, put them on for 3 hours on 120C, glaze in the last 30 min?
 

SemiCullen

Still haven't got the hang of Thursdays
#15
Since the sun is out and I'll have some time for the weekend.. I'm going to try my hand at spareribs.

I'm thinking babyback ribs, dry rub them, wait an hour, put them on for 3 hours on 120C, glaze in the last 30 min?
You might need to go closer to five hours at that temp. They're done when you can insert a temp probe or toothpick into the meat and it goes in with no resistance -- like you're sticking the probe/toothpick into room temperature butter.
 

mirage2101

Well-Known Member
#16
You might need to go closer to five hours at that temp. They're done when you can insert a temp probe or toothpick into the meat and it goes in with no resistance -- like you're sticking the probe/toothpick into room temperature butter.
Even for babyback ribs? I have the time, that's not the issue. I just get hungry as some point so I'd like to time that they're done around dinner time.
 

SemiCullen

Still haven't got the hang of Thursdays
#17
Even for babyback ribs? I have the time, that's not the issue. I just get hungry as some point so I'd like to time that they're done around dinner time.
Yeah man. Babybacks are even thicker than spares in some spots, and it's the thickness that governs cook time.
 
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