Anyone own a 2015 Gibson Les Paul?

Shredder79

Well-Known Member
#1
Hi all!

Apologies if this should be in the GAS thread, but I find myself desiring an actual USA, Gibson Les Paul. Posting this here, as I expect this may well produce more debate, and may well deserve its own thread? From what I've read online already, the opinion on these is very polarised!

Yeah I'm a little late to the party once again, but I've found a few 2015 models available for an amazing price, and am struggling to resist! BUT, there are none nearby in stock to sit and actually try, so it'll have to be a bit of a blind purchase.

So, does anyone own one? I'm particularly looking at the Traditional or Standard models, maybe the Less+. So, if anyone owns one of these, I'd be really interested to know your thoughts on them, particularly how you feel about the wider necks. I like the idea of the GForce, so how that holds up for real would be interesting.

Thanks in advance...I may well think of other questions to ask, but for now....let battle commence! :)
 
#3
I bought a 2015 Les Paul Classic in January of this year, which was reduced from about £1600 to around £830. It's got the robot tuning and everything, and even though it's not one of their highest grade tops and it's a bit wonky, I like the looks a lot.

For the rest....to be honest, I'd feel a bit disappointed if I'd paid the full retail price for it. It is a nice guitar, but I can't say that it feels like it's worth more than twice the price of my Epiphone Rosso Corsa (which was one of the most expensive Epiphone Les Pauls). The Gforce tuning is OK but usually I have to tune a couple of times to get it spot on, and it's really not obvious how to do anything other than tune it to the current setting unless you have the manual in front of you. I have enough guitars to keep ones in different tunings, so it's not a killer feature for me and I'd be just as happy without it.

In common with most Les Pauls, I think, the neck joint is rather chunky and access to the highest frets is not great. That's one change that I really like the look of in the 2016 HP models. Of course, with the 2015 models you have the ugly "Les Paul 100" logo on the front of the headstock and the tacky hologram on the back, but you don't see them when you're playing.

Re the wider neck, I'm afraid I'm not a good enough guitarist to be that sensitive to such a small change. For me, it's fine, and I'm happy to have a bit more neck to prevent me from accidentally pushing the string off the edge of the frets when I'm bending, which occasionally happens with one of my other guitars in particular. If you're very sensitive to neck dimensions, which I clearly am not, maybe you want to try before you buy.

Overall, it's a nice guitar, it satisfied my Gibson gas and I'm happy with it for the price I paid, but for the full price I think you can find more interesting alternatives. But if you definitely want a Gibson Les Paul and can find one at a bargain price, then a Gibson Les Paul is what you'll get, and I would think you'll probably be happy with it

I recall that doctorpaul bought a 2015 Less+ about which he was very complimentary on here, so no doubt he'll mosey along here sooner or later to give his feedback on that.
 

A1binoA11igat0r

Well-Known Member
#5
I have 2 2015 Gibson Les Paul model guitars, an LPM and a Studio. As far as the neck width is concerned I find them just as comfortable to play as my 2013 LP Traditional Pro 2, just different. The width makes it much less likely to "fall off the edge" of the fret-board while digging in with some wide vibrato. My 2015 Studio has the "Slim Taper" neck profile, as does the fore mentioned Traditional Pro 2, so I suppose that's about as "Apples to Apples" as you're going to get. The 2015 neck instantly feels heftier when you grab it, the width is definitely noticeable, but in my experience does not effect the play-ability at all. In store when purchased I bonded with it very quickly and it's never felt uncomfortable to play. neither the LPM or the Studio have the "asymmetrical" neck profile of the standard, and I have no experience with that particular neck. The brass 0-fret nut has wear problems, so Gibson offers titanium replacement units as warranty repair, upon request, and the Titanium nut is great. G-Force is completely usable and pretty quick/accurate. Changing strings can be a bit tricky at first but once you get the hang of it, can be done quite quickly.

Of course these are all just my personal experiences, and (obviously) yours may vary.
 

Shredder79

Well-Known Member
#6
Hi GloopyJon and A1binoA11igat0r!

Thanks guys, exactly the kind of feedback I was hoping for! To add, I have tried both the Standard and Traditional 2016 models (not HP), both of which tick the boxes for me. After playing Jackson and Washburn guitars for years, I was surprised to find myself preferring the 50's neck of the traditional. Obviously the extra switching options on the standard are cool, but supposed I could get those added to the traditional at a later date!

The 2016 models I tried are just a bit too much for me right now, but the 2015 traditional I've seen is just under £1K and the Less+ is about £200 cheaper! All very do-able!

The '100' logo and the hologram don't bother me all that much, as you said GloopyJon, getting a new LP at a bargain price will make me very happy indeed!
 

MrDon

Owner of a heap of shit dentist guitars
#13
I have a 2014 Les Paul and have played a few 2015 models...

One thing that was apparent on all the models I played was the fret work - it was poor. Because there are no nibs on the fret ends all the frets felt sharp. The nut on a few of the models I played was badly cut too.

I did get the fret ends tidied up on my own 2014 model and it is beautiful to play now.
 

A1binoA11igat0r

Well-Known Member
#16
I have a 2014 Les Paul and have played a few 2015 models...

One thing that was apparent on all the models I played was the fret work - it was poor. Because there are no nibs on the fret ends all the frets felt sharp. The nut on a few of the models I played was badly cut too.

I did get the fret ends tidied up on my own 2014 model and it is beautiful to play now.

If you're purely talking about "Fret Sprout" meaning that the ends protrude from the edge of the fret-board, that's a bit unfair to criticize. Every guitar I've ever owned (without binding over fret ends) have done that when the fret-board shrinks a bit over time, this includes my Select Series Strat (which cost every bit as much as my LP). I'm certain that the guitars didn't leave Gibson's production facility that way. What 2015 models were you playing that didn't have the 0 fret nut? Were they late model year runs?
 

Felix

Addicted to Grunge
#17
If you're purely talking about "Fret Sprout" meaning that the ends protrude from the edge of the fret-board, that's a bit unfair to criticize. Every guitar I've ever owned (without binding over fret ends) have done that when the fret-board shrinks a bit over time, this includes my Select Series Strat (which cost every bit as much as my LP). I'm certain that the guitars didn't leave Gibson's production facility that way. What 2015 models were you playing that didn't have the 0 fret nut? Were they late model year runs?

Late 2015 Les Paul's came with a traditional spec.
 

johnniegoat

Stop, don’t, come back.
#18
my mate has a trad 2015. very lovely, except the perimeter burst

i know i go on a bit, but check out Amazon Warehouse - they get guitars back through 2nd hand, and often they drop quite quickly

there are a couple of trads on their now
 

Lone Star

Well-Known Member
#19
I would like a "proper" Gibson too, but with only a tiny amount of money avaulable I'm not sure if I should go for a really early entry level Studio, or save up (knowing full well I'll just spend my savings on food and heat).
SG Standard mate. The original LP and a better guitar for the money imo. I can see myself with an SG rather than a LP.
 

deedug

Well-Known Member
#20
I was lucky enough to have a trip to London Recently. I went to all the shops on Denmark street and also took the time to go to Andertons in Guildford. I must have played 30 Gibson Les Pauls over those 2 days. I must admit I would love to have a Les Paul. And here is the but. I am shocked at how poor quality they are. I found that in order to get a good one you have to pay over 3000 pounds English.

The main issue was bad fret work. Some of the LPs for 1500 was like playing a bread knife. I have to admit I played one of the nicest guitars ever but it was a custom shop LP and it cost 4500 pounds. My Chapman ML2 Classic is as good as anything you can get from Gibson for about half the price. I just don't get why you have to pay so much for a Gibson before you get a normal guitar.
 
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